Tag Archives: low handicap

End of Season Stats Check. Did I Improve?

Fall is here, or should be here at least. We have unseasonably warm weather.  My goals were set for the end of October, so while I may squeak in a couple more rounds, I will review the conclusion to the season.

My original goal this season was to decrease my handicap to 14. I planned to spend 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week practicing.  I started around a 16 handicap, and I believed I could shave 2 strokes off my handicap.  As my mid-season report indicated, I failed to realize my handicap was artificially low due to older scores.  My most recent scores averaged between 18 and 20 index.  I revised my goal mid-season to get back to 15.8 where I started.  While I didn’t drop it to 15.8, I decreased my handicap from 17 to 16.2 since July!  I am on the right track!  I may not be at 15.8, but a declining handicap is what matters.

I set the number goal at the beginning of the year, but research indicates focusing on the number does not lead to success. Numbers are the measurement, but focusing on the process makes the most difference.  My most important goal was practicing 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. I hate to say it, but I didn’t meet that goal as often as I hoped.

30 minutes a day is harder than I anticipated. I know that sounds silly, but all my activities combined with exhaustion make adding more work in difficult.  However, I did meet the goal about half the time.  I did much better in the summer and right after my mid-season report.  I struggled more during the fall due to my teaching load.  However, I never went a week without practicing.  I completed a simulated practice or real round nearly every week.  I reached 4 days a week the vast majority of the time.  Rarely did I practice less than 3 days a week.  I know I didn’t reach the goal every week, but I practiced significantly more than before.  My stats show continuous effort with the decreasing handicap.

My stats illustrate my improvement and areas to continue to work on. Below are the stats from April:

Time Period Fairways GIRs Scrambling Putting
May 2015-April 2016 42% 17% 10% 1.9

 

The work paid off this summer in most areas. Here are my stats since I started my plan:

Time Period Fairways GIRs Scrambling Putting
April 2016-Present 59% 11% 25% 1.8

 

Fairways and scrambling dramatically increased. Playing from the short grass must inevitably lead to more GIRs.  While I missed more greens (down to 2 per round), I scrambled for par on 2.5 more holes per round.  Scrambling alone decreased my handicap to the 16.2.  My glaring weakness is still GIR, so I will continue to work on approach shots to score better.

My winter improvement and workout plan will begin shortly. As I think through the plan, I hope to set it up to include activities my family can get involved with to increase my chances of completing the daily tasks.  Come back in the next couple weeks to check out the winter plan.  Enjoy your last rounds of the year.

No Club, No Problem!! 2 Easy Techniques to Improve at Work

Is working getting in the way of golf? It always does for me, but paying the bills and feeding the kids makes abandoning a job impossible.  I am finding ways to be at work and still get in practice time, sometimes even the 30 minutes for the day.

Practice at work? How is that possible?  No, I don’t work at a golf course, nor do I work near a golf course.  My first inclination would be to hit a bucket during lunch, but I don’t have that option.  However, I found a couple techniques could help me improve at work without losing my job.

The first technique I like is mental reps. I know it sounds crazy, but numerous authors and researchers say mental reps, which is imagining every detail of playing, can improve a swing.  Craig Sigl in his product Break 80 Without Practice discusses mental reps.  He tells a story of a POW held overseas for a significant amount of time.  When the soldier came back, he played amazing golf.  When asked, he said he imagined himself playing rounds every day.  The intricate details of playing allowed his mind to ingrain his swing without actual practice.  His brain went to the same place and made the same swings when he put the clubs back in his hands.

We can all do mental reps. As a disclaimer, I am not saying to do these instead of working.  I do them during breaks, lunch, etc.  Spend time imagining every aspect of playing a round of golf.  Go through the pre-shot routine, the swing, watching the ball fly, and walking to the next shot.  The more detail in the mental rep, the better.  I have also done this right before going to sleep.

The second technique I use at work is swinging without a club. Dave Pelz discusses this approach in one of his books.  He tells the story of one of the instructors he knows having a group of students practice certain moves without a club, many times at work.  The instructor didn’t do it intentionally.  It was his suggestion for busy clients who couldn’t get to the range.  They could also do it during the winter.  He found students doing reps without clubs made swing changes quicker.

I try focusing on 1 move during a week. I spend 10-30 minutes during lunch doing the swing without a club.  I am deliberate and not going quickly.  Once I get to the range, I sometimes do the same move without the club during my warmup.  Feeling the movements can help transition to the club.

Most of us have to work, but we can use small breaks to make big improvements. Every little bit helps and can lower scores.  Share this on Facebook and Twitter to help others improve while working!

Mid-Season Progress Report: Doom and Gloom or Starting the Climb?

Progress and improvement is portrayed like a math equation. Add a little work here, do a few drills there, and lower scores result.  Incremental progress is the goal, and every ounce of work should get us closer to the goal.  If that is the case, results should follow the same incremental approach, even if the results are slow.  My experience is the progress is more asynchronous.

I planned to improve by spending 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week on different aspects of golf. Check out my Current Handicap Page to see where my handicap started.  I set 2 goals.  The first was to lower my handicap from the 15.8 to 14 by the end of the season.  The close to 2 strokes seemed possible with the work on each aspect of my game.  I believe extra work should lower scores.

Unfortunately, my handicap is not dropping right now. As you see, my handicap is now at 17.  17!

HCP 7-22 2

Not only is it not going down 2 strokes, it is actually up 1.2 strokes. My mind raced when I saw my trend up.  Is it possible that my effort is making me worse?  Would I be better off not practicing?  Should I change my plan?  What should I do?

After thinking all those thoughts, I remembered the important goal of completing the progress. Most research indicates focusing on the result doesn’t normally lead to success.  Focusing on the process is what matters.  My current situation is the exact reason why process is the most important.  If I succumb to the idea that practice isn’t working or my effort is in vain, I will stop practicing or drastically change my plan.  Revisiting a plan is periodically necessary, but continual refocusing diminishes results.

The real question should be whether I completed my 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. The honest answer is the majority of the time I did.  I have weeks with 3 to 4 days, but over half the time, I get to 5 days a week.  The practice time and completion isn’t the problem.  If true, then maybe I am not doomed.

The bright side begins to light up. Comparing the score lists on my Current Handicap Page, I realize why my handicap rose this year.  My oldest 7 scores were calculated in my original handicap, and all those rounds happened in 2014.  Unless I played at a similar level, then my handicap would rise.  My handicap at the beginning of my process was not an accurate reflection of my current performance level.  The handicap was artificially low due to good scores from over 2 years ago.  I breathe a little easier.

I also notice my handicap differentials for this year. Since starting the process, my differentials are decreasing.  From the beginning of the year through June, my differentials ranged from 19-22.3.  My last 2 differentials in July dropped below 18.  Looking closer at the numbers, I am improving.

I also feel like I am improving. My contact is much better.  I am focusing on shifting my weight correctly to compress the ball.  My trajectory is up.  I hit my 5 wood and hybrid better than ever the last couple rounds, and my ball flight is much straighter.  My GIRs are slightly up over the last 5 rounds, and I am still hitting a similar number of fairways.  I am showing improvement.  This is exactly what I am looking for.

My handicap is up at the mid-point, but I believe the numbers indicate improvement. My handicap started artificially lower, and my last 5 rounds are showing improvement in all areas.  14 may not be realistic by the end of the season, but I should be able to get back in the 15 range.  However, I am not focused on that number.  My goal is to practice 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week.  Share my story on facebook and twitter to help others continue the journey to improvement.

Struggle and Joy of My Last 2 Golf Rounds

Pure joy, frustration, exhilaration, anger, fist-pumping, despair, and anticipation for the next round can all describe my last 2 rounds on the golf course. Golf evokes the widest range of emotions in a short 3-4 hours.  I experienced all those emotions twice in the last few days.  I can’t wait to go back.

April and May are busy months for me, so I wasn’t able to play rounds. I stayed on track with my plan, but optishot simulation is as close to the course as I came.  Optishot is nice, but it isn’t the same as the course.

 

Round 1 – Choctaw Creek 

I played a round at Choctaw Creek on Day 1. Choctaw Creek isn’t the best maintained course, but I found a great deal on Golfnow.  Our region received significant rain the last couple weeks, so the fairways weren’t mowed low (or at all) and shots wouldn’t roll out.  It played much longer than the 6000 yards on the scorecard.

The round started exactly as planned. I scored well on the optishot recently, so my expectations are high.  I placed my first drive in the middle of the fairway.  Great start.  I hit the second shot poorly and left it short of the green.  Chipped it past the hole.  2 putt bogey.  Not terrible.

The second hole started a poor stretch. I pulled the drive way left.  I didn’t get close enough for a chip, so I pitched it over the green.  Couldn’t get up and down for bogey, so double.  Third hole is an uphill par 3.  I pulled an extra club because I wasn’t hitting the ball pure.  The shot landed short.  Chip up.  2 putt. Bogey.

The frustration begins bubbling. Every mishit or off target shot brings me closer to screaming.  I double 5 and 9.  Front 9 47.  Choctaw Creek is not a difficult course.  I take a deep breath and decide to make a swing change.  I know changing the swing mid-round is a terrible decision, but this swing is not working.

As my Golftec post indicated, I have multiple different instructors’ swing philosophies duct taped together for my swing. I can tell I am out of sync and trying to manipulate the club with my hands.  My lower body and shoulders turn faster than my hands move, so I get stuck.  My shots are either wide right or hooks left.  2 way misses are unplayable.  I decided I would swing what felt like only halfway back to keep everything in sync.

In the age of instant gratification, the change tested my patience. Hole 11 and 12 were terrible.  I tripled both holes.  However, I struck the ball more solid.  My short game contributed a few of those strokes.  My swing was more in sync.  Pure strikes built confidence and my short game touch came back.  I played the next 6 holes in 3 over par with 3 one-putts.  I didn’t hit any GIRs, but I placed the ball close enough to get up and down.  I strolled to 18 tee box planning to hit my last fairway, and I did.  I still missed the green with an iron, but an up and down finished off the round with a par!  92 isn’t what I wanted, but only 3 over on the last 7 holes is exactly what I needed.

 

Round 2 – Guthrie Country Club

I found another good deal on Golfnow for Guthrie Country Club for the following day. The course is only a 9 hole course, but the slope is 133.  The greens are tiny.  The fairways are tree lined.  The course is better maintained than Choctaw Creek, but the recent rain still meant the grass wasn’t short.

I finished strong yesterday, so I walked to the first tee knowing today would be better. The first hole is a long par 3.  I struck a 5 wood reasonably well, but it landed short.  Chipped up and 2 putted for bogey.  The greens are moving a little slow, and my putter must be open at impact.  All my putts fall right at the hole.

The 2nd hole is a short par 4.  I crush a driver down the middle of the fairway.  I flush a wedge to 30 feet.  2 putts and a par.  My first GIR in 2 days.  The joy is growing.  The feeling of halfway back still works.  Hitting it solid also means I am not losing distance.

Everything feels and looks better after an easy par. Then the 3rd hole happened.  Crushed driver, but it faded too far right.  I proceeded to hit every tree on the right of the fairway before finally taking my double.  I proceeded with bogey, bogey, double, double, double.  The exhilaration is gone.

I am on 9 with despair. My fix isn’t working.  All my shots are pull hooks.  I finally realize on 8 that I am significantly closing the clubface in the downswing while also pulling left, so I hit numerous pull hooks.  Something must change.  Again, I uncharacteristically make a slight tweek on 9.  I focus on the club exiting right.  I can handle the draw or hook as long as it starts enough right.  I hit a pure 4 hybrid with a baby draw.  The gentle breeze brought it back towards the pin to 20 feet.  2 putt par to finish the firsts 9 at 46.  Not ideal, but progress is possible.

I played another 9 to get my 18 holes in. The back 9 got better, but I struggle with consistency.  The reason making swing changes doesn’t work on the course is because the changes won’t happen every swing.  My swing and emotions flipped back and forth with nearly every shot.  I had great drives down the middle but mishit the approach.  I had 3 doubles on the back, but also managed 2 pars going into 9.

My confidence rose walking to the 9 tee box. Water lines the right, but I hit such a beautiful shot the first time.  I knew I could do it again. I pull the same hybrid, make the same smooth swing exiting right, and the shot came off the club even better.  My ProV1 starts just right of the flag.  A small curve left and lands 15 feet short and right.  The ball rolls towards the hole and stops 3 feet short.  Great Shot!  I loved it.  I sped to the green.  I line up the 3 footer and sink the birdie!  Great finish.  2nd 9 43 for an 89.

Immediate results with huge score drops don’t happen. I am happy I scored better my second round.  I know my focus now.  Feel like half swing to stay in sync.  Club exits right, and I should focus on club hitting ground after ball.  Improving those areas will consistently give me a chance to score well.

 

Sign up with your email to follow along my progress. Good luck in your next round.

How to Follow Your Golf Improvement Plan While Traveling

I have a routine for every morning. The alarm goes off at the same time.  I hit snooze 3 times.  I proceed to shower and get ready the same way every day.  I like the routine.  It makes life easy.  The days where I need to get to work early or my son’s school does something different throws me completely off.  The day feels off.

Golf improvement is the same way. I want to follow the exact days on the schedule.  I know when everything will happen.  When the week is not normal, then planning is critical.  I know many people just want to go day by day, but only looking at one day makes it easy to keep putting off practice because the day is busy.  Pushing the practice back usually means it won’t happen.  To prevent missing practice,  I look at the week on Sunday night to see what is happening to get a sense of where to make adjustments.

I was out of town the last few days in NYC. Bethpage Black is on my bucket list, so my plan for months was to blog about an amazing experience on the Black.  I could also get in my round for the week that way.  Unfortunately, the timing didn’t work and I couldn’t play a round while here.  I didn’t want to get off track though, so I planned to still practice while there.

My week generally includes 2 days off. I was gone 3 days, so I could take 2 off and still be on track.  This week, I plan to take Tuesday and Thursday off since those are travel days.  I am not taking my golf clubs, so creative solutions are necessary.  I thought of a few.

Ideas to Stay on Track

My first idea is to practice turning without a club. One of my major problems is my upper body and lower body get out of sync.  When that happens, the club gets stuck behind me and under plane.  My shots will be blocks or hooks.  I could work on staying in sync and getting everything together.

I am a golf nerd who loves all gadgets and training aids. About 10 years ago, someone bought me a golf travel kit.  It has a putter, hole, and a couple balls.  Here it is on Amazon:

I used it multiple times on golf trips just for fun.  I know it isn’t the perfect putting aide, but I can definitely work on starting the ball on line.

A newer version has a telescoping putter.

Putting would be helpful, but I googled driving ranges in Manhattan to see if I could hit balls. I found Chelsea Piers Golf Club.  It is a 4 tier driving range with rental clubs.  Range time is even better than putting practice, so I decided to head out there.

I completely enjoyed the experience. I received a bay on the first floor.  I wish I was on one of the higher tiers, but I still enjoyed the bottom floor.  I purchased 128 balls, and the machine auto tees the ball.  Great way to be lazy and just hit balls.  The Hudson with Yachts in the background made great scenery for a driving range.

My only complaint is the rental clubs. Renting from the front desk is a mistake.  They provide old and beat up clubs.  They gave me what must have been an original Taylormade 9 iron, a 6 iron from the 80s, and a driver with the bottom caved in.  The NY Golf Shop attached had brand new clubs to rent for a higher price, but they closed at 8.  I didn’t finish until after 8, so that wouldn’t work.  In spite of the equipment, I hit the ball reasonably well.  I would definitely recommend the facility to keep up the practice.

Following the plan while out of town requires planning ahead.  Take a travel club or find a local driving range.  Make sure to not give yourself excuses to miss practice.  Looking at the week to know where problems will arise and where adjustments can be made makes success easier.  Success won’t magically happen.  Success requires constant planning and adjusting to make everything work.  Remember, the process is what matters.  Keep up the great progress.

Post in the comments your favorite secrets to staying on routine and practicing while traveling.

Executing and Assessing My Golf Improvement Plan

I love to eat, and I definitely love to eat a variety of foods. Quality buffets (yes, there are a few) are among my favorites because I can pile my plate high.  I put everything on my plate with huge expectations, and then, I fail to eat everything.  My eyes are always bigger than my stomach.  Our practice expectations succumb to similar problems.  After buffet style planning, executing and evaluating our execution are the next steps to success.

 

Executing the Plan

Top sports psychologist continually profess the need to focus on the process and execute a clear plan. We all hit great shots that take bad bounces or have putts hop on bumpy muni greens.  Focusing on what we can control is important, so we must focus on the process.

The key to execution is following the plan. My plan is to spend 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week practicing.  The plan is fool proof.  30 minutes is easy to find in a day, right?  I spent 3 weeks so far trying to follow the plan.

You should write down or make mental notes of the progress for evaluation, so I noted a few patterns. I don’t get my 30 minutes on days with kids’ sporting events.  30 minutes seems easy, but working and the sport make getting through anything else difficult.  However, I can spend time at the course with my son for longer than an hour and work on chipping and putting.  Doing both doesn’t follow spaced repetition as well, but I practice the same amount of time on the short game.

 

Assessing My Execution

Execution is easier said than done. We must now assess whether our eyes were bigger than the time to practice throughout the week.  30 minutes a day sounds easy, but work, kids’ games, and life can take up every extra minute.

When assessing execution, analyze:

  • Did I complete the tasks in the plan
  • Were the tasks effective
  • Do I need to adjust the plan or tasks

 

 

Completing the Tasks

I succeeded week 1!! The first week is also when motivation and intention peaks.  Unfortunately, I didn’t succeed in week 2 or 3.  I made it to 4 days of 30 minutes in Week 2, and Week 3 fell to 3 days.  3 days is more than before my plan, but I need to determine whether to change my plan.  Psychologists say continually failing will decrease motivation, so if I set myself up for failure, I won’t continue the journey for the long term.

Week 2 included 4 days of at least 30 minutes, and I only missed my chipping day. Week 3 missed a short game day (either chipping or putting since I did both one night) and the round.  Looking back, I want to say Week 2 and 3 were abnormally busy, but those weeks were probably similar to my normal week.

 

Tasks Effective

Completing the plan is great, but the tasks must improve my golf swing. I do believe the interleaving tasks helped me.  At the range and my house, I continually change clubs.  Switching forces me to focus on the new setup, swing, etc.  I perform each swing more deliberately.  Putting practice is harder at home, but I worked on starting the putt on line.  In a future post, I will discuss the different indoor putting work I do without true roll, but starting the putt online is helping.  As I said a couple weeks ago, the optishot helps with simulation.  I like switching clubs and creating the pressure of a round.  I normally play online with someone, so I have the added pressure of winning.  The tasks are working.

 

Adjust Plan

3 Weeks is a short period to make adjustments, so I will continue to note whether I can execute. I will continue to update my progress.  To stay the most up to date, sign up below to get the newest information as I post it.

 

Everyone enjoy the nice golf weather!



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3 Techniques for Every Golf Practice Session

Jordan Spieth, Rickie Fowler, Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, and pretty much every other professional golfer practices different than recreational golfers. They follow fundamental principles that most of us don’t imitate, but should.  We want their swings, but we don’t do the same thing to get there.  Now, I am changing my practice to take my range swing to the course.

“Practice does not make perfect, only perfect practice makes perfect.” Vince Lombardi knows a few things about improving athletic skills, so perfecting our practice habits should be a priority.  My practice has not been perfect.  I would put an alignment club on the ground and pick a flag for some of the shots.  I would hit close to 100 balls switching clubs after 3-5 shots.  My practice and range swings look like this:

DSCF0043

Nice balance, good finish. Swing of beauty.  However, somehow the real swings are more like this:

DSCF0045

Falling back, inconsistent, pretty ugly. I need more real swings like the top picture, so I will focus on 3 techniques to make that happen:

  1. Interleaving practice
  2. Spaced Repetition
  3. Game Simulation

 

Interleaving Practice

Interleaving practice is not a new concept, but a few authors began discussing it for golf recently. The idea is that continually practicing one specific skill for a long period of time (block practice) isn’t the most efficient way to learn the skill.  For golf, hitting 10 6 irons, 10 7 irons, 5 8 irons, 15 drivers, 20 wedges, and finishing with 15 hybrids is inefficient, and what most people do.  A recent article regarding research from UCLA states that practice should vary to create lasting improvement.  Each shot should be with a different club, to a different distance, with a different target.  The idea is the brain focuses on each task intently and continually learns from the experience.  New shot requires the brain to focus more, which leads to long term learning.  The researchers conclude less practice that is varied will produce better results than beating balls for hours.

Brad Brewer, top 100 golf instructor, recently wrote on his website about the same ideas. My practice now includes less time or shots with more switching clubs.  I have 2 full swing practices each week.  1 will be in my house without a ball similar to Haney’s advice.  I switch clubs, the direction I face, and my imaginary target each shot.  My other full swing session is normally on the range.  I only buy 2 tokens now and switch clubs and targets with each shot.  I have difficulty switching clubs after a bad shot, but the research says this is the best way to practice.

 

Spaced Repetition

Spaced repetition is another concept neuroscience says will make huge improvements for skill development. Spaced repetition is when you study or practice for shorter increments of time but over multiple days as opposed to spending long hours only on 1 day.  Cramming everything into 1 day, like cramming for college midterms, holds the information for that day, but the information is lost quickly.  Studying for the same amount of time over the previous few days permits the brain to process the information, create schema, and create long lasting knowledge.  Recent research says the same is true for athletic skills.  Spending 1 day a week at the range for 1.5 hours is less effective for long term development than 3 days of 30 minute practice.  I spend 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week practicing.  The consistent practice over more days will get the brain thinking about my swing for a longer period, which should lead to longer term improvement.

 

Game Simulation

How many times do you play golf holes on the driving range? All the great golfers simulate golf rounds while practicing, so we should to.  Before professionals go to the first tee, many of them play the first few holes on the range by imaging the hole and hitting the clubs they will use on that hole.  The idea is to simulate the pressure, shots, and experience before hitting a real shot.  Anything that puts pressure on shots improves the ability to repeat the shot on the course.  I play a rounds on the optishot at home and turn off all gimmies and mulligans to make it a real score.  Optishot is still a game, but I can try to beat previous scores and create pressure.  I finish range sessions with point games to see how many greens I can hit out of 10 shots or how many draws I can hit out of 10.  My putting practice includes games against my kids.  The idea that every shot counts makes improvement more likely.

 

We all want better pro-style swings, but many of us don’t follow the best practices to get there. Post comments below with great ideas for games or practice techniques following these principles.

My Plan to Work Full Time and Improve at Golf

Do you envy professionals because they can practice every day. I believe I could dramatically reduce my handicap practicing 8 hours a day, but my family may not be happy if I quit my job.  That dilemma is what most of us face.  You and I have full-time jobs, but we also want to keep improving.  Good news, I believe we can improve even with full-time jobs!

“If you fail to plan, then you plan to fail.” Most of us heard this quote from Ben Franklin, and most of us understand it.  However, have you created an improvement plan to decrease your handicap?  I hadn’t created one either.  I went to the range and tried to get better, but I didn’t have a clear idea what “get better” meant.  I also didn’t focus on the areas that would lead to the most improvement.  Now, I will follow step 2 of my improvement approach and build a quality plan.

30 minutes a day will change my handicap. It may not bring me to single-digits this summer, but I can easily get to 14.  I won’t cut back time with my wife or kids because they are too much fun, but I waste 30 minutes hitting snooze or playing on my iPhone.  I know I can commit to 30 minutes a day, at least 5 days a week.  Sounds too simple.  However, I remember watching Hank Haney tell Rush Limbaugh to make 100 swings a day, and Rush made significant improvement in a short amount of time.  100 swings take about 30 minutes.  I will employ even better learning theories from recent neuroscience research in my next blog to maximize my 30 minutes.

Planning to spend 30 minutes a day isn’t a detailed enough plan. I get 5 days a week, so I should break down what I will do on each of those days.  I intend for 1 day to be a round of golf on the course or on my optishot.  I need to split the other 4 among specific golf skills.  Here are my current stats to help determine where to spend time.

Time Period Fairways Greens in Regulation Scrambling Putting
May 2015-Present 42% 17% 10% 1.9 per hole

 

My stats show ok fairways and putting. I have the biggest opportunity for improvement in GIR and Scrambling.  Having that information, I won’t spend extra time with full swing drivers.  My plan will be:

 

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Break 30 Minutes on Full Swing 30 minutes putting Break 30 Minutes Chipping or Pitching Golf Round (optishot or course) or 30 minutes Full Swing 30 Minutes Full Swing or Golf Round

 

I now have a plan. I can follow a schedule and put in the time.  I believe the time can reduce my handicap to 14 by the end of the season.  The time is now to make improvements, and I encourage you to follow my progress.  Sign up below to join my mailing list to follow my progress.  You don’t want to miss my next post demonstrating how I will use those 30 minutes.



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